January 05, 2015
Many businesses are turning to Empire Ventilation Equipment to provide the ventilation for life-saving structures
With more than 850 confirmed tornadoes in 2015 in the U.S. alone, an increasing number of companies are building and selling storm shelters. Many of these businesses are turning to Empire Ventilation Equipment to provide the ventilation for these life-saving structures. Tornadoes are more common in the United States than in any other country with most occurring east of Rocky Mountains. Research proves that storm shelters save hundreds of lives each year and with more people recognizing this, companies are working hard to meet consumer demand. In order to meet Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) guidelines, proper and adequate ventilation is required for the shelters. Empire has been providing customers with quality ventilation products for more than 60 years. Empire serves the locations hit with the majority of the tornadoes where people are deciding to protect their homes and their families from these devastating natural disasters.
FEMA  |  Ventilation  |  Storm Shelters
 
December 15, 2014
Ice Dams and Mold

When your home or building was first constructed, your builder or architect was the person who decided whether or not to install a ventilator on your roof or attic. Now you can make your own choice. The question is should you? If your home or building is located in a cold climate, roof ventilation will help you keep your roof’s temperature cold, which in turn will help prevent ice dams from forming. Ice dams forms when a warm roof begins to melt the snow that has accumulated on a roof and then freezes as the outside air temperature drops to below freezing. The new ice often forms in the building’s gutters and other drains: acting like a dam, it blocks the water formed by melting snow from draining though the gutters into drywells or other water control systems. When enough water pools on your roof, whether from rain or additional melted snow, it will flow over your gutters and cascade onto promenades, sidewalks and adjacent parking areas. Once on the ground, the cold air and surface temperature will turn the water into ice, which presents a serious risk of personal injury or damage to property.

In warmer climates mold growth can be a concern. Some molds have been associated with respiratory problems while others have been associated with immune system disorders. One of the major causes of mold growth is stagnant, moist air that can build up in attics.

One way to eliminate the cause of mold growth is to keep air from becoming stagnant and minimizing moisture buildup. In many instances, installing a Turbine ventilator on the rooftop and Soffit vents under the eaves will allow outside air to be brought into the attic while the turbine vent facilitates the removal of hot, moist air.

It’s easy to see why installing ventilators on your roof is not just hot air, it’s a good idea. In both cold environment and hot ones, ventilating your attic will save you money because it will restore balance in your building, reduce your energy consumption and minimize mold and mildew growth at the same time. It’s a winner.

Ventilator Installation  |  Cold Climate  |  Ice Dams  |  Mold Issues  |  Turbine Ventilator
 
November 04, 2014
Itís not just the hot air, itís the pressure

Installing one or more turbine ventilators on a rooftop is an effective, yet, surprisingly inexpensive solution to ventilating an attic or crawl space. Depending on the diameter of the vent and the wind speed outdoors, a turbine vent can expel surprising quantities of hot, humid air. A relatively small Ventilator, such as a 12-inch diameter turbine vent, exposed to a constant wind speed of 5 miles per hour (mph), for example, can move 347 cubic feet of air per minute (cfm) from a space. A single 14 inch diameter turbine vent exposed to a constant wind speed of 15 mph winds can expel up to 1,342 cfm of air. Even when the winds are still, these vents allow warm air to move up and out of the attic through a turbine vent. As air is pulled out of the attic through a turbine vent, the air pressure in the attic becomes lower it will try to pull outside air into the attic space through soffit vents attempting to restore pressure balance between the outside and inside air. If the air pressure isn’t equalized, a vacuum may be created. Since it can’t pull air in from outside to restore the equilibrium, the vacuum may pull warm or cool air from the inside of the house: causing energy loss, which makes it more expensive to heat or cool the house. The process described above is one of the major reasons many of today’s municipal building codes require new houses to be built with soffit vents: to relieve the pressure that may cause a vacuum and pull cooler or warmer air from the inside of your home, wasting energy while raising your heating and cooling bills. Or, to put it another way, when your turbine and soffit vents are working correctly and in unison, you can save money and be more comfortable at the same time.

Attic Ventilation  |  Crawl Space  |  Turbine Ventilator
 
October 03, 2014
Why poke a hole in my attic

Brian Taylor Brian can be reached at info@empirvent.com

It doesn’t seem quite right, my carpenter and roofer both told me to poke a hole in my attic. But why would I want to loose all that hot heat in the winter when I just added new insulation and a new layer of roofing to keep my attic and my house warm and comfortable? And, what about the cold air that’s bound in come in through my new hole?

Here’s what I learned when I looked into it these questions. The combination of letting the hot air out and the cool air in is actually the key to a durable and energy-efficient building. The explanation is really so simple that most people in the construction business just take it for granted that everyone understands the physics involved.

In the winter, it works by allowing a natural flow of outdoor air in to the attic keeping cooler. Keeping it cooler reduces the possibility of melting ice that has built up on your roof re-freezing at the gutters when the temperature drops again, causing an ice dam that can damage the roof. Proper insulation and air sealing also keeps attics cold in winter by blocking the entry of heat and moist air from below. In the summer, natural airflow in a well-vented attic moves super-heated air out of the attic, protecting roof shingles and removing moisture. In addition, new roofing resists heat transfer into the house.

The most common mistake homeowners make when installing insulation is blocking the flow of air at the eaves or by other venting devices, such as Eveco, siphon and turbine vents. The truth is, you should never cover attic vents with insulation.

Attic fans are intended to cool hot attics by drawing in cooler outside air from attic vents and pushing hot air to the outside. However, if your attic has blocked soffit vents and is not well sealed from the rest of the house, attic fans will suck cool conditioned air up and out of the house and into the attic. This will use more energy and make your air conditioner work harder, which will increase your summer utility bill.

No matter what types of vents you choose as a channel for outside air to move into the attic and hot air to move out, make certain you use vents that are well built, use recycled materials and are themselves recyclable. Make sure you do it anyway because, like the professionals say, venting works so get on board.

Attic fans  |  Energy Efficiency  |  Air Flow
 
September 15, 2014
10 Simple Steps Homeowners and Building Managers Can Take to Avoid Moisture Problems

Although it is important for rain to replenish our water supply and keep our trees and plants healthy and attractive, water intrusion into our homes and other buildings can present serious health and structural risks when it remains inside the wall cavities.

  1. Install waterproof barriers in your basement and crawlspace walls to prevent it from penetrating the walls or it may cause wood rot and mold growth.
  2. Inspect roofs for leaks because even relatively small leaks can cause wood rot and mold blooms. If you find any leaks patch them to prevent or eliminate water intrusion.
  3. Caulk around all your windows and doors.
  4. Direct all water coming off your roof away from your house by sloping the soil around your house or building so that water flows away from it.
  5. Use wide overhangs to keep the rain away from your walls and windows.
  6. Use large gutters and gutter guards to help keep rain from dripping onto the ground near your house or building.
  7. Be sure that the condensate from your air conditioner is properly drained away from your house
  8. Make sure that sprinklers and other watering systems for your lawn or flowerbeds do not spray water on the side of your house or building or saturate the ground near the house.
  9. Make sure to adequately ventilate your home of building because rain isn’t the only culprit: people generate moisture when they cook, shower, do laundry, and even when they breathe.
  10. Carefully plan moisture escape paths for attics, crawl spaces and other areas in your home or other building that have limited air circulation.
 
August 15, 2014
Avoiding Moisture Build-up Reduces Indoor Air Quality Problems

Moisture buildup could mean poor indoor air quality. Just look at what happens when you take a shower: the hot water from the shower heats up and moistens the air. When the warm, moist air comes into contact with the much cooler surface of a mirror, the temperature differential causes moisture to condense onto the mirror’s surface where it become becomes a liquid. The same thing happens in houses and other structures we occupy: moisture condenses inside one or more of the walls, in crawl spaces and attics. Then, because you can’t wipe off the moisture, it builds up and causes wood rot and mold growth.

Other challenges to maintaining good indoor air quality include the people and pets that live or work in the building: they produce moisture when they breath, eat and perspire. In fact, a typical family adds about three gallons of water per day to their indoor home environment.

Over the past few decades, builders have learned a great deal about how to minimize moisture buildup in buildings. Unfortunately, construction costs have been high, so budgets haven’t allowed builders to absorb the cost of better construction techniques: techniques that might reduce or eliminate uncontrolled airflow and indoor air quality problems in the future.

In other words, it’s up to the homeowner to minimize the chance of water entering their buildings and producing air quality problems. First, they should keep their roofs in good condition and make certain they have adequate air circulation by installing a good ventilator. They should also check to see if crawl spaces have adequate ventilation.

Other important steps include making sure that their clothes dryer is properly vented to the outside. Closed off or obstructed vents can cause the dryer’s moisture to enter the living space, causing mold growth and unsafe air quality. Roof gutters and drains should also be kept clear of debris to allow water to drain away from the house or building. In addition, kitchen and bathroom vents should lead directly outside and caulking and flashing around windows, doors, tubs, and showers should be inspected and sealed, if necessary.

Homeowners should not wait until poor ventilation causes moisture problems that lead to structural degradation or health issues. They should be proactive by repairing leaks and clogs and they should install ventilation solutions that reduce or eliminate indoor air quality problems before they begin.

It will save money and make their families more comfortable and healthier. As the old saying goes, an ounce of protection is worth a pound of cure.

Indoor Air Quality  |  Moisture Buildup  |  Homeowners


Empire Ventilation Equipment Co., Inc. - Est. 1933

35-39 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY 11106  |   All of our products are proudly MADE IN THE USA

About Us   |    Contact Us   |    Log-In   |    View Shopping Cart

Accessories Bases Louvers Ventilators / Spring Registers / Fans
1/2“ Mesh Screens
Insect Screens
Dampers For Syphon/Eveco
Dampers For Turbine Ventilators
Adjustable Bases
Economy Bases
Standard Mounting Bases
• Flat Bases
• Ridge Roof Bases
• Curb Bases
• Slope Roof Base
Cast Aluminum Ventilators
Extruded Aluminum Ventilators
Flange Extruded Ventilators
Flush-Flange Louvers
Roof Louvers
Soffets
Strip Ventilators
Eveco Ventilators
Insul-Ventilators
Syphon Ventilators
Turbine Ventilators
Booster Fans
Spring Register

© Copyright 2014. Empire Ventilation Equipment Co., Inc. All Rights Reserved. Site Designed and Maintained by Rapport Associates, Ltd.

Eveco Ventilators
Insul-Ventilators
Syphon Ventilators
Turbine Ventilators
1/2“ Mesh Screens
Insect Screens
Dampers For Syphon or Eveco
Dampers For Turbine Ventilators
Adjustable Bases
Economy Bases
Standard Mounting Bases
• Flat Bases
• Ridge Roof Bases
• Curb Bases
• Slope Roof Base
Booster Fans
Cast Aluminum Ventilators
Extruded Aluminum Ventilators
Flange Extruded Ventilators
Flush-Flange Louvers
Roof Louvers
Soffets
Strip Ventilators
Spring Register
About Us    |    Pressroom    |    Contact    |    Building Codes   |    Blog
Home    |    Log In    |    Shopping Cart